Boeing Won’t Sell Many VIP Versions Of The 777X, But Check Out How Fabulous They’ll Be

If your posse or your executive team is outgrowing your Gulfstream, Boeing has a new alternative: a business jet version of the forthcoming 777X.

The fuel-efficient long-haul airliner, which will have two variants that can seat between 350 and 425 passengers, offers a stunning canvas when configured for personal or corporate use.

Boeing Business Jets released three concepts Monday for interior designs for the VIP version of the company’s largest and longest-range twin-engine plane.

The Majlis lounge and dining area in Jet Aviation's concept for the BBJ 777X. The ceiling has a composite finish of fine metal powders laid over a carved surface that's meant to evoke waves of hammered metal.

The Majlis lounge and dining area in Jet Aviation’s concept for the BBJ 777X. The ceiling has a composite finish of fine metal powders laid over a carved surface that’s meant to evoke waves of hammered metal.Jet Aviation

Cutting out seating for hundreds of passengers makes room for opulent lounges, a game and cinema area, and a Turkish-style steam bath in a Middle Eastern-themed design called Shaheen (Arabic for royal white falcon) from Swiss interiors firm Jet Aviation that was unveiled in Dubai at the Middle East Business Aviation Association Show.

Dumping the weight of those passengers and their baggage also allows for a roughly 33% increase in range to 11,645 nautical miles for the BBJ 777-8 and a 44% increase to 11,000 nautical miles for the larger 777-9. That’s good enough to fly nonstop from Seattle to Dubai or London to Sydney.

The master suite in Jet Aviation's Shaheen concept.

The master suite in Jet Aviation’s Shaheen concept.Courtesy of Jet Aviation

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It doesn’t come cheap: The list price for the BBJ 777-8 is $442.8 million and the BBJ 777-9 is $453.6 million. (The airliner versions list for $360.5 million and $388.7 million, respectively.) And those prices don’t include the interiors, which are added by separate completion companies. That could run another $90 million to $175 million.

Not surprisingly, Boeing doesn’t sell a lot of wide-body business jets–it has only delivered 47 since 1996, including 13 777s and 12 787s. The buyers are largely heads of state and private companies that frequently fly large delegations, say BBJ executives.

The master suite in Greenpoint Technologies' BBJ 777X concept features this posh dressing area.

The master suite in Greenpoint Technologies’ BBJ 777X concept features this posh dressing area. Courtesy of Greenpoint Technologies

There’s a larger market for VIP versions of Boeing’s smaller 737, its bestselling plane—BBJ has delivered a total of 185 of those. Roughly half of the buyers are private owners. Those 185 planes are a drop in the bucket for Boeing, which expects to deliver at least 810 commercial aircraft this year, but there are compelling reasons for it to target the business and government market.

[“source=indiatoday]